Dr. Yarema Reshitnyk

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Dr.  Yarema Reshitnyk completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Waterloo, Canada, in 2008. His research work in his final year project was on low temperature dilatometry, studying phase transitions in crystals. He then went on to complete his PhD at the University of Queensland, Australia, in 2014. His research project consisted of studying and characterizing SQUID tunable microwave resonators. Upon sumitting his thesis, he officially joined the Fedorov group in October of 2013, where worked on studying quantum phenonomena in systems consisting of superconducting artificial atoms, microwave resonators and mechanical oscillators. He was also responsible for setting up the infrastructure required for experiments and for some new fabrication equipment within the group. In September 2015 he moved to UK and is now working for Oxford Cryogenics.

2016

The ability to determine whether a multi-level quantum system is in a certain state while preserving quantum coherence between all orthorgonal states is necessary to realize binary-outcome compatible measurements which are, in turn, a prerequisite for testing the contextuality of quantum mechanics. In this paper, we use a three-level superconducting system (a qutrit) coupled to a microwave cavity to explore different regimes of quantum measurement. In particular, we engineer the dispersive shifts of the cavity frequency to be identical for the first and second excited states of the qutrit which allows us to realize a strong projective binary-outcome measurement onto its ground state with a fidelity of 94.3%. Complemented with standard microwave control and low-noise parametric amplification, this scheme can be used to create sets of compatible measurements to reveal the contextual nature of superconducting circuits. 

Reshitnyk Y., Jerger M. and Fedorov A., 2016
EPJ Quantum Technol., 3, 1, pp. 1-6

Three-dimensional (3D) microwave cavities with embedded superconducting quantum bits (qubits), provide a popular and versatile platform for quantum information processing and hybrid quantum systems. A current issue that has arisen is that 3D superconducting cavities do not permit magnetic field control of qubits embedded in these cavities. In contrast, microwave cavities made of normal metals can be transparent to magnetic fields, but experience a much lower quality factor, which negates many of the advantages of the 3D architecture. Here we presented measurements of a device that bridges a gap between these two types of cavities with magnetic field control and an order of magnitude higher quality factor compared to all previously tested copper cavities. An added benefit to that our hybrid cavity possesses is that it also provides an improved thermal link to the sample that superconducting cavities alone cannot provide. A large improvement in quality factor and magnetic field control makes this 3D hybrid cavity an attractive new platform for circuit quantum electrodynamics experiments.

Jerger M. et al, 2016
Nature Communications, 7, pp. 12930

Contextuality is one of the most fundamental properties of quantum mechanics, distinguishing it from classical physics without a need for nonlocality or entanglement. It is also a critical resource for exponential speedup in universal surface-code quantum computing. Our result is the first experiment violating a noncontextuality inequality with an indivisible system where entanglement cannot be defined which also addresses all known major loopholes, such as the detection, compatibility and individual-existence loopholes. Violating noncontextuality with superconducting circuits, a leading candidate for implementing surface-code quantum computing, comprises an important conceptual milestone in demonstrating their suitability for quantum technological applications.

The ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems

This Centre of Excellence seeks to initiate the Quantum Era in the 21st century by engineering designer quantum systems.